2010 Spring National ACS Meeting: CWCS Symposium

CWCS workshop program alumni made a series of presentations at the National Meeting of the American Chemical Society on March 21, 2010 in San Francisco. The focus of the presentations was how the speakers have incorporated materials from the workshop into their own teaching.

 

The session began with a brief overview of the CWCS by Cianan Russell ("Center for Workshops in the Chemical Sciences (CWCS): An overview of the workshops, communities of scholars, and the assessment," Cianán B. Russell, David M. Collard, Lawrence J. Kaplan, Patricia S. Hill, Jerry C. Smith.)

 

This was followed by two presentations (available below) by alumni of CWCS Forensic Science workshops led by Professor Larry Kaplan at Williams College:

 

-CWCS FORENSICS WORKSHOP ALUMNI- M. Scott Goodman, Buffalo State

"How a CWCS workshop can lead to funding, curricular changes, and a new career in forensic science."

 

-CWCS FORENSICS WORKSHOP ALUMNI- Maria Schiza, Millerville University

"Impact of an NSF advanced forensic science workshop on the development of a new forensic chemistry course."

 

The remainder of the presentations focused on other CWCS workshops:

 

"Workshops in the Chemical Sciences inspired curriculum transformation in undergratuate organic chemistry course in a community college, " Bal Barot and David Alonso.

 

"Fostering a fundamental understanding of NMR in undergraduate laboratory courses," John A. Frost and Bradley M. Moran.

 

"Teaching the significance of resolution in protein X-ray crystallography with COOT," Monika Sommerhalter.

 

"CWCS Green Chemistry Workshop 2005: Changes in curriculum, research and a department," Alicia B. Todaro, Michael R. O'Brien, and Hillary Hofstein.

 

"Art and chemistry: The whole picture," Anne Gaquere-Parker.

 

"Nitration of substituted benzenes: Recasting an old standby," Jacqueline A Nikles.

 

"Guided inquiry and curriculum reform at Northwestern University," Owen P. Priest.

 

"Effects of changing the chemistry lab from cookbook to inquiry: A new nursing chemistry lab approach," Jessica B Rogers.

 

"Undergraduate student research in microwave-promoted organic syntheses," Douglas Armstrong.

 

"NSF CWCS Surface Science Workshop, Kettering University, Flint Michigan, June 2006: Post workshop experience in professional development," Roy D. Wilcox.

 

"Chemistry Software and Molecular Modeling course forundergraduate and masters level graduate sstudents," Shailendra Kumar.

 

"How the 2007 CWCS workshop entitled “Practical Aspects of Process Analytical Chemistry” initiated a new career direction," Marina C. Koether.

 

City: 
San Francisco
State: 
CA
Presentations: 

Chemistry Software and Molecular Modeling course forundergraduate and masters level graduate sstudents

A course on chemistry software and molecular modeling was developed for chemistry undergraduate students and the masters level graduate students. It has been successfully offered for the past four years. The course is divided into two sections. The first section, which is about 20% of the course, prepares students to learn chemistry drawing software to prepare professional reports involving 2-D and 3-D drawings of molecules, reactions, mechanisms, and tables, which are routinely used in scientific reports and publications.

Authors: 
Shailendra Kumar, Dr., PhD
Author Affiliation: 
Department of Chemistry Governors State University University Park IL United States

Guided inquiry and curriculum reform at Northwestern University

The experiences gained at the 2006 CWCS workshop (Teaching Guided Inquiry Organic Chemistry) have been instructive as Northwestern overhauls the undergraduate organic laboratory curriculum to reflect a more green and guided inquiry model. Following the workshop, a 2.5 million dollar renovation of the laboratory space has been completed. The new space is much more open and conducive to the types of collaborative experiments that were part of the 2006 workshop. In addition, more guided inquiry experiments have been introduced into Northwestern's curriculum.

Authors: 
Owen P. Priest
Author Affiliation: 
Chemistry Northwestern University Evanston IL United States

NSF CWCS Surface Science Workshop, Kettering University, Flint Michigan, June 2006: Post workshop experience in professional development

The CWCS Surface Science Workshop at Kettering University has played a major role in the author's professional development in research and teaching activities. Training and exposure to SEM and XPS were instrumental in the author's timely completion of his dissertation and PhD at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (December 2006) on thermal effects on the morphology and surface composition of white oaks used in beverage flavors and aromas.

Authors: 
Roy D. Wilcox,
Author Affiliation: 
Math and Natural Sciences Lincoln Memorial University Harrogate TN United States

Teaching the significance of resolution in protein X-ray crystallography with COOT

One key goal of the upper-division undergraduate course

Authors: 
Monika Sommerhalter, PhD
Author Affiliation: 
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry CSU East Bay Hayward CA United States

How a CWCS workshop can lead to funding, curricular changes, and a new career in forensic science

The author attended a CWCS forensic workshop at Williams College in Summer 2002. This experience directly resulted in the funding of a NSF-CCLI (A&I) proposal. The funding allowed full development of a new upper-level course (Forensic Chemistry Laboratory), which covers several topics presented at the CWCS workshop, but at a level suitable for senior-level forensic chemistry students. Among the many experimental topics covered in the new course, students now perform STR analysis of their own DNA, drug analysis, and arson analysis.

Authors: 
M. Scott Goodman, PhD
Author Affiliation: 
Department of Chemistry Buffalo State College Buffalo NY United States

Impact of an NSF advanced forensic science workshop on the development of a new forensic chemistry course

The increased interest in Forensic Science seen in society, has served as a "trigger" for the initiation of Forensic Science programs in several undergraduate universities. Faculty from different scientific backgrounds and different disciplines, have been involved in teaching Forensic Science undergraduate courses at different levels. That can be challenging, if your scientific background does not encompass all other disciplines involved in Forensic Science.

Authors: 
Maria V. Schiza, PhD Laura Ruiz Espelt,
Author Affiliation: 
Chemistry Department Millersville University Millersville PA United States

How the 2007 CWCS workshop entitled

A new curriculum in Pharmaceutical Chemistry (effective fall 2010) and research area in drug release is building from the experiences of a 2004-2006 Merck-AAAS grant, a 2006 Pittcon workshop and a 2007 weeklong CWCS workshop which included tours of Merck Co. and Johnson and Johnson. In 2009, The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation funded the purchase of a dissolution tester, which began the research in drug release and the new curriculum in Pharmaceutical Chemistry.

Authors: 
Marina C. Koether
Author Affiliation: 
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Kennesaw State University Kennesaw GA United States

Nitration of substituted benzenes: Recasting an old standby

After participating in the 2006 CWCS workshop Teaching Guided Inquiry Organic Chemistry, I expanded the nitration of methyl benzoate, a popular sophomore organic experiment, to include six other substituted benzenes. Students work in teams, each team nitrating a different compound, and are asked to determine how different substituents will affect the outcome of substitution on the ring. The substitution pattern for each compound is determined by proton NMR. Students pool the data, and use the pooled data to answer the original question.

Authors: 
Jacqueline A Nikles, Dr., PhD
Author Affiliation: 
Department of Chemistry University of Alabama at Birmingham Birmingham Alabama United States

Fostering a fundamental understanding of NMR in undergraduate laboratory courses

NMR spectroscopy is a tool that many undergraduate students are able to use for routine measurements, but they frequently have little understanding of the fundamental principles that govern these instruments. This may preclude students from realizing the full potential of NMR spectroscopy in their future careers. The costs associated with the large research grade instruments typical of most universities prevent students from being able to spend the time necessary to explore these instruments and understand the intricacies of how they work.

Authors: 
John A. Frost, Bradley M. Moran
Author Affiliation: 
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Milwaukee Wisconsin United States

Effects of changing the chemistry lab from cookbook to inquiry: A new nursing chemistry lab approach

A nursing chemistry laboratory was taught in traditional verification style and students were surveyed to assess their perceptions of the educational goals of the laboratory (Fall 2008). A literature review resulted in a more discovery based laboratory manual and an analysis of the needs of nurses resulted in more application based activities. This new format was implemented (Fall 2009) and the students will be surveyed to assess their perceptions of the educational goals of the laboratory at the end of the semester and compared to the previous semester.

Authors: 
Jessica B Rogers
Author Affiliation: 
Department of Math and Physical Sciences Lubbock Christian University Lubbock TX United States

Undergraduate student research in microwave-promoted organic syntheses

By participating in a workshop sponsored by the "Center for Workshops in the Chemical Sciences" at Miami University (Ohio) in 2005, much was added to my knowledge and interest in microwave. This participation seemed to make my university more willing to buy a microwave instrument. I picked the Biotage Initiator model. Using it, I have been mentoring the research of undergraduate students in microwave-promoted organic syntheses. The students experience microwave as having far more potential than conventional heating.

Authors: 
Douglas Armstrong, Prof., PhD
Author Affiliation: 
Department of Physical Sciences Olivet Nazarene University Bourbonnais Illinois United States

Center for Workshops in the Chemical Sciences (CWCS): An overview of the workshops, communities of scholars, and the assessment

From 2001-2009, CWCS has provided 90 workshops at 30 host institutions on a variety of topical areas. The material from the workshops has been used by a large number of the 1500 participants to improve undergraduate education at their home institutions. The workshops serve as the foundation of a new initiative to build strong

Authors: 
Cianan Russell
Author Affiliation: 
School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta GA United States, Department of Chemistry Williams College Williamstown MA United States, Department of Chemistry Millersville University Millersville PA United States, Department of Chemistry Georgia State University Atlanta GA United States

Workshops in the Chemical Sciences inspired curriculum transformation in undergratuate organic chemistry course in a community college

One year organic chemistry, the whole course, was redesigned after attending workshops of Teaching Guided-Inquiry Organic Labs and NMR, sponsored and supported by CWCS. The basic principle in this transformation included encouraging active learning, providing students with individual assistance, on-line assessment and progress monitoring mechanism. This new modification of course included time changes in course offerings and experiment modification in the laboratory instruction. Before attending CWCS workshops, one year organic chemistry was divided in two parts at Lake Michigan College.

Authors: 
Bal Barot, Dr. David Alonso, Dr.
Author Affiliation: 
Department of Science Lake Michigan College Benton Harbor Michigan United States, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Andrews University Berrien Springs Michigan United States

Art and chemistry: The whole picture

In 2006, the author participated in the NSF Workshop: Chemistry in Art for the expressed purposed of implementing art related examples in chemistry courses. The following year, utilizing resource material from the workshop and acquired through literature search the author proposed, created and implemented at the University of West Georgia an introductory chemistry of art course for non science majors. This positive experience led to the development in 2008 of an upper level course, advanced analytical chemistry, that is cross-listed with a special topics course in the art department.

Authors: 
Anne Gaquere-Parker,
Author Affiliation: 
Department of Chemistry University of West Georgia Carollton Ga United States

CWCS Green Chemistry Workshop 2005: Changes in curriculum, research and a department

Attendance at the 2005 Green Chemistry workshop has had a substantial impact on the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Siena College. A green organic chemistry lab curriculum was introduced and continues to move forward. Currently all organic experiments use green chemistry principles. Student research projects are directed toward better green organic chemistry labs to be used in this curriculum. This change has, in turn, affected other research programs in the department to develop and improve green chemistry labs in general and inorganic chemistry labs.

Authors: 
Alicia B. Todaro, Dr., PhD Michael R. O'Brien, Mr Hillary Hofstein, Ms
Author Affiliation: 
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Siena College Loudonville NY United States